Employees Dis-Engaged? Here’s How To Fix It…

iStock_000015842329_TugOWarLast March, a Gallup poll revealed that only 34.1% of US workers consider themselves “engaged” in their jobs. That’s one in three! Take a quick look around your team — if you’re overseeing six people, there’s a good chance that two of them would have identified as disengaged on the survey.

 

What might disengaged behavior look like?

  • Quality of work has gone down
  • Attendance is suffering
  • Less engaged in meetings or conversations
  • No longer taking initiative for new projects
  • Quietly sabotaging or undermining the work of others
  • Negative talk about project
  • Work is turned in late, or ignored

If you recognize any of these signs in your employees — either as a long-term problem or as infrequent behaviors — they’re probably disengaged.

What can you do about it?

Getting to the root of disengagement

First, it’s important to understand why a particular employee has become disengaged. It could be an internal issue, such is a problem with their home life or health — or, it could be an external issue with the job itself.

There isn’t much you can do for the former besides offer support, but you can take steps to fix the latter.

An employee can become disengaged for any number of reasons — each of which will require you and your employee to work together to come up with the right solution.
  • They may simply be burned out on the job, and need some time away.
  • They may disagree with the direction the team is going, and need to feel their voice has been heard.
  • They may dislike the work they’ve been assigned, and need to switch gears.
  • They may have an interpersonal conflict with a coworker, and need to work through it.
Disengagement can be a signal of apathy, or it can be a signal of rebellion and dissatisfaction. That’s why it’s so important to have a nonjudgmental discussion with your employee to come up with a solution together.

How would you describe your business?Promoting engagement among all your employees.

Regardless of why your employee is disengaged, there are some things you can do to promote engagement among all of your employees.

Give them ownership in their projects.
If your employees feel like they have a personal stake in work they do, they’ll feel more engaged. Achieve this by listening to and incorporating their opinions, and by giving them the leeway to do things how they’d like, without trying to micromanage the project.
Provide recognition.
If your employees don’t feel like they are ever recognized for the work that they do, they’ll stop caring how it is done. Provide acknowledgment and recognition to your team members when they do exceptional work, or at a specific milestone. This could be something as simple as sending an email to your supervisors acknowledging the work of your team, or as involved as taking them out for a celebratory lunch, or bringing in cookies.
Connect their work and career.
Many employees become disengaged when they get stuck in a rut, or feel that their role is a dead end. Reignite their passion for the work by helping them reach their potential — through training, increased responsibilities, and helping them design their future with the company.
Nip your engagement problems in the bud.
When even one employee is disengaged, the quality of the entire team’s work suffers. Plus, resentments may begin to build when other team members step in to pick up the slack. In other words, one disengaged employee can have a domino effect, knocking down the successes of your entire team.
Don’t simply ignore employee engagement problem and hope it will clear up on its own. Nipping it in the bud is critical if you want to keep the morale up among your entire team.
If you would like learn more about how you can get your dis-engaged employees re-engaged in your business, call Coach Michael Stelter at Advanced Business Coaching, Inc. (262) 293.3166.
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